Little Monuments, 1861 – 1865

Little Monuments in Grace Park, Lee Circle

Virginia secedes from Union Two flag poles. US flag 2/3 down, CSA flag 1/3 from top (not the battle flag)
Evacuation of Richmond Woman running, carrying child, looking back over shoulder
Robert E. Lee Memorial  (Existing Structure)
Lee Surrenders Table, pens, paper, inkwell, hat. Two swords rest against table.
13th, 14th & 15th Amendments XIII, XIV, XV as Pillars

Lee Circle is the centerpiece of Monument Avenue. There are a myriad of philosophical, generational, political, historical, racial and cultural underpinnings associated with the avenue that comedian Robin Williams labeled “the world’s largest collection of second-place trophies.” Representations of honor, heritage, Southern nobility. Representations of treason, slavery, generations of oppression. And that, my friends, begins to scratch the surface of the emotions surrounding The Monuments.

This is the circle where east-west Monument Avenue intersects with north-south Grace Park. Adding content to the singular view of The Avenue, we suggest adding four Grace Park little monuments; two south, two north of the General. These four are in keeping with the factual history of the war and it’s aftermath.

As we walk from Grace Park South, from the 1700’s into the 1800’s, Little Monument 7 is two flag poles with the U.S. flag being lowered on one pole and the C.S.A. flag being raised on another.

Little Monument 8 displays the burning and evacuation of Richmond with the universal symbol of a woman protecting a babe in arms, a child clinging to her skirt, fleeing the horror of war.

On the north side of General Lee’s statue, the table Little Monument 9 from Appomattox Courthouse. At last, swords are at rest against the table.

Little Monument 10 is Roman Numerals XIII, XIV and XV as Pillars (literary and figuratively) — the Constitutional Amendments abolishing slavery, defining citizenship and guaranteeing the right to vote.

NEXT: Little Monuments, 1865 – 1945

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